Cocoa butter filtration

Cocoa butter filtration, why filtration is needed in cocoa?

Cocoa butter still contains varying amounts of solids

  • Depending on pressing
  • Due to mesh size in press
  • Due to (often) broken mesh elements in press
  • => cacao butter content 0.2 – 1 %, normally 0.5 %

Cocoa butter has to be clear to meet the quality requirements.

Cacao butter filtration was one of the first Cricketfilter® applications in 1988. The Cricketfilter® is a pressure filter with a large specific filtration area due to the shape of the filter elements. The Cricketfilter® is unique because of its patented filter elements, which allow discharge of the filter cake by back pulsing.

The Cricketfilter® is used for clarification of cacao butter, directly after the cacao press. The Cricketfilter® is a proven filter system in this industry and successfully in use at many major cacao producers.

Clarification of cacao butter is thickening filtration. The Cricketfilter® is fed by a top feed. At the end of the filtration cycle the filter cake is back pulsed and sediments into the filter cone. The cylindrical part of the filter is emptied via the partial drain. Thereafter the cake slurry is drained through the bottom valve. The cake slurry is sent back to the feed tank before the cacao press, avoiding any product loss.

cocoa butter filtration

Our Cricketfilter® is well suised for filtration of cacao butter

  • No precoat allowed and needed
  • Direct filtration over filter cloth

In existing factories the Cricketfilter® mostly has replaced filter presses.

The Cricketfilter® offers the following advantages over a filter press:

  • Fully closed filtration system
  • No personnel needed for permanent monitoring and discharge
  • Fully automated discharge instead of long cleaning times
  • No filter aid needed and no product lost

Cricketfilter® vs. separator: Further treatment needed after separator

The basic filtration cycles in cocoa butter filtration are:

  1. Thickening filtration of cacao butter
  2. Filling
  3. Recirculation
  4. Filtration
  5. Backwashing
  6. Sedimentation
  7. Partial emptying
  8. Slurry discharge